SlideShare Presentation: Basic beliefs and concepts in Hinduism

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Free eBook: Hanuman’s Adoration for Lord Rama

I have put together a free eBook (through Draft2Digital) that includes an English translation of the Hanuman Chalisa (with my notes added) from this blog and my summary of the Sundar Kand from the Ramayana. It is available at Nook, Kobo, and Scribd. The links are given below:

Nook

Kobo

Scribd

When Krishna accepted Sudama’s rice

Sudama was a poor Brahmin who had been Lord Krishna’s classmate as a child. Following his schooling, Sudama spent most of his time in remembrance of the Lord. Because his family did not even have enough for food, once his wife asked him if he could visit Krishna’s palace to ask for some alms. Sudama accepted the proposal, not for the monetary gain, but for the darshan [1] of Krishna, the Supreme Being, that the visit would lead to. As soon as Sudama reached Krishna’s palace, Krishna, along with his queen Rukmini, started serving Sudama. Krishna gave the frail jiva [2] a hug and washed his feet.

After giving Sudama a majestic reception, Krishna inquired if Sudama had brought any gifts for Krishna. Sudama had brought some puffed rice for Krishna but hesitated to offer it to Krishna, the wealthiest amongst kings. Krishna, the knower of all, understood what was in Sudama’s mind. Krishna immediately grabbed the rice and ate some of it. Sudama was over-whelmed at how Krishna treated him, a weak jiva, in his palace. The love for Krishna in Sudama’s mind did not allow Sudama to ask Krishna for a monetary loan. Consequently, Sudama left the palace empty-handed. He was, in fact, pleased by not receiving any monetary gifts from Krishna, for this implied, in Sudama’s mind, that Krishna did not want Sudama to be trapped in materialism, according to the Srimad Bhagavat Purana.

As soon as Sudama reached home, Sudama was surprised to see that his hut had turned into a grand and luxiruious palace, and his family had been blessed with incomparable status, wealth, and servants. He at once understood that Krishna had blessed him with riches. The Srimad Bhagavat Purana says that when Krishna blesses his devotees, he does not inform them beforehand, for Krishna considers many of his blessings humble. On the other hand, when he receives a tiny gift, like fruits or rice, from an individual soul, he accepts it as an enormous offering because it is laden with devotion for him. Because Sudama was already saturated with love for Krishna, Sudama accepted all the material benefits that Krishna gave him but his mind never got attached to them and his love for Krishna increased progressively. This interaction between Sudama and Krishna supports Krishna’s statement in the Bhagavada Gita that Krishna accepts any gift that is offered with devotion (Bhagavad Gita 9.26).

[1] face-to-face meeting with God

[2] individual soul

This blog is back

After a gap of about five years, this blog is back with a new name — Hindu Routes to God.

In the process of migrating this blog from the previous web address, some of your comments may have been lost. Your comments are valuable to this blog; feel free to post new ones.

Edited on May 5, 2019.

Yogavasistha: Tandava and the dissolution

It is believed that Rudra, a form of Shiva, performs the Tandava dance with his Shakti when it is time for the dissolution of the universe. However, according to the Yogavasistha [1], this dance is a continuous process. Symbolizing the impermanence of the material world, the entire universe, where every single object is destructible, becomes the theatre for Tandava. The drying up of water bodies, destruction of the fourteen worlds, and the collapse of the stars – are all a part of Tandava.

Describing his own vision of a great dissolution from a kalpa [2] of the past, Rishi Vasistha, in this scripture, explains that the Tandava concluded when Rudra engulfed the entire universe as if it were a leaf. Rudra, beyond comprehension, then turned invisible, according to this book. As of the universe, nothing but absolute peace and consciousness remained, which is the true nature of Shiva [3].

[1] Note that the Yogavasistha supports the philosophy of Advaita Vedanta. Hinduism involves multiple philosophies, and alternate and more detailed descriptions about the universe’s dissolution can be found in other Hindu scriptures.

[2] aeon

[3] According to popular Hindu theories, following the dissolution of the universe, numerous abodes (loka) of God continue to exist, where beings live permanently with God.

Holi: Celebration vs. Renunciation

In the most popular traditional story about Holi, Prahlada, one of Lord Vishnu’s child devotees, was not only saved from an aunt who hated him, but he was also saved from the boon of Lord Brahma, the writer of the divine plan. What Brahma writes on the blueprint for the universe unfolds to cause major predestined events in our lives. Had Prahlada left everything for destiny to work out, he might not have been saved; the divine plan created by Brahma, based on flawless karmic calculations, could have been on Holika’s side. But Prahlada made the right choice — the only choice that could have saved him.  He took the refuge (sharanagati) of Lord Vishnu and found the divine plan overridden by Vishnu’s grace. For us, Holika probably represents very powerful circumstances, filled with anger, hatred, restriction, and conspiracies. Prahlada represents a being who is apparently weak but is solely dependent on the Supreme Soul — Vishnu. Of course, Vishnu modified Prahlada’s circumstances, destroyed Holika, and saved Prahlada.

In the other story related to why Holi is celebrated, Shiva turned Kamadeva, the god of desires, into ashes. Following the elimination of desires from the world, Shiva, in his divine play, continued to focus on his blissful self, and Devi Parvati started her meditation on Shiva (for thousands of years) to get her marriage proposal accepted. For us, the festival indicates that whenever an individual being begins the remembrance of Pavati-Shiva, they take the individual being in their protection and trigger his or her spiritual journey by closing the three gates to hell — kama (lust/desires), krodha (anger), and lobha (greed) — for the individual being. With time, renunciation and pure love win over the individual being’s instincts.

We can waste the occasion of Holi by extravagant shopping, partying, gossips, drinking, making fun of others, or watching scrawled TV programs. Alternatively, we can give the festival some spiritual meaning by eliminating at least a single selfish desire.

Edited on May 9, 2019.